Qadian ke Arya aur Hum


Original Name

قادیان کے آریہ اور ہم

Alternate Original Name

**

Romanized Name

Qadian ke Arya aur Hum

Alternate Romanized Name

**

English

Qadian's Aryas and I

Meaning

It is a story of the dealings of the authors with the Hindus of Qadian, some of whom belonged to the Arya Samaj movement.

Language(s)

Urdu

Author

Mirza Ghulam Ahmad

Pages

44

Publication

20 February, 1907, Magazine Press, Qadian

Summary

This booklet has been previously translated into English by H.L. Saxena but we were not able to find it. In the words of the author, it is about the Hindu residents of Qadian who had heard that the author had declared them to be witnesses of his 'signs' and who had published an article in 'Arya Akhbar' denying any such involvement.

Sections

  • Title and Poem and prediction of a Great Sign about to be shown.
  • Pages 1-20: The author says that he mentioned his former friends, Lala Sharampat and Lala Malawamal, as witnesses to his prophecies made 26 years ago to which the latter have taken exception. The two Hindus published a pamphlet ten years ago (circa 1896) informing people that Mira Ghulam Ahmad was a charlatan and ran a shop of religion. The author takes two liberties: describes his earlier 'revelations' as prophecies, and then embellishes them with events of the near past as 'fulfilment'.
    • 'The sin of Lekhram's murder is upon the Hindus of Qadian'
    • Hindu Arya religion piles filthy abuse on all prophets sent by God, whereas followers of Sanatan Dharam regard all prophets with respect. Making peace with this nation is like keeping a venomous snake in one's sleeve.
  • Page 21-40: Coming to the 'real goal' of this pamphlet - that Lala Sharampat, brother of Lala Basambar Das, has published an advertisement in the Arya Akhbar saying that 'we have never witnessed any sign' of the author. 'This lie is worse than eating the filthiest filth'. The author then goes on to list a few court case decisions and other events that he had 'prophecied' and invites the advertisers to swear that they are false. These accounts are also riddled with post-facto wording of generic and non-specific 'revealed' statements.
  • Page 41 onwards: polemic in prose and poetry against the Hindu religion, specifically the Arya Samaj points of view. Contains vulgar references to the custom of Niyog Pratha
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