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Humphrey J. Fisher

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  1. 1 Koya, Fathuddin Sayyed Muhammad, Islam and the Ahmadiyyah Movement, 1995, Bauch, College of Islamic Studies, 80 p.
  2. 2 Fisher, Humphrey J., "Planting Ahmadiyya in Ghana", West Africa 2226, 1960, pp. 121
  3. 3 Fisher, Humphrey J., "The Ahmadiyya movement in Nigeria", African Affairs 1, 1961, pp. 60-88.
  4. 4 Fisher, Humphrey J., "Ahmadiyya in the Gambia, French territories and Liberia", West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 93
  5. 5 Fisher, Humphrey J., "Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone", West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 73
  6. 6 Fisher, Humphrey J., Ahmadiyyah: A study in contemporary Islam on the West African coast, 1963, London, Oxford University Press, 206 p.
  7. 7 Akanbi, Hafsa Mosunmola, Ahmadiyya in Lagos, 1968, bachelor thesis, University of Ibadan
  8. 8 Lanfry, Jacques and Michael L. Fitzgerald, "The Ahmadiyya community and its expansion in Africa", Encounter: Documents for Muslim-Christian understanding 2, 1974
  9. 9 Balogun, Ismail A. B., Islam versus Ahmadiyya in Nigeria, 1977, Lahore, Sh. Muhammad Ashraf, 187 p.
  10. 10 Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya: Urban adaption to the Ivory Coast, 1980, Ph.D. dissertation, Boston University, 252 p.
  11. 11 Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Migrant women in Abidjan, 1983, Boston, Boston University, African Studies Center, 16 p.
  12. 12 Yacoob, May M., "Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan", Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.
  13. 13 Yacoob, May M., "Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan", Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.
  14. 14 Yacoob, May M., "Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan", Nehemia Levtzion and Humphrey J. Fisher (ed.), Rural and urban Islam in West Africa, 1987, Boulder, Lynne Rienner, pp. 119-134.
  15. 15 Solaja-Alagago, R. O., Evolution of Anwarul-Islam movement of Nigeria: The Nigerian solution to the Ahmadiyyah problem, 1984, master thesis, University of Ibadan

Koya, Fathuddin Sayyed Muhammad, Islam and the Ahmadiyyah Movement, 1995, Bauch, College of Islamic Studies, 80 p.

Contributors
Koya, Fathuddin Sayyed Muhammad

Fisher, Humphrey J., "Planting Ahmadiyya in Ghana", West Africa 2226, 1960, pp. 121

Contributors
Fisher, Humphrey J.

Abstract
History of the Ahmadiyya in West Africa in its three disparate elements: in the South, the mass conversion of

Fisher, Humphrey J., "The Ahmadiyya movement in Nigeria", African Affairs 1, 1961, pp. 60-88.

Fisher, Humphrey J., "Ahmadiyya in the Gambia, French territories and Liberia", West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 93

Abstract
The Ahmadiyya movement has met with much opposition from the orthodox Muslims, in the Gambia, who disapproved of Ahmadiyya doctrine and disliked their separatism. The government was concerned for Muslim harmony and was afraid for damage of Muslim-Christian relations. The Gambian Ahmadis however, are not zealous in dogmatic conviction nor in particularist action. Their chief concern is Islamic education; 1960, the coming of a missionary was allowed and a school will be built. Ahmadi penetration in French territory is very slight. In Liberia an Ahmadi mission has been established only a short while ago.

Fisher, Humphrey J., "Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone", West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 73

Abstract
In Sierra Leone Ahmadyya was established as a corollary of a gold rush. Nazir Ahmad Ali is the father of Sierra Leonean Ahmadyya; he began his carreer in the Gold Coast in 1929 and was transferred to Freetown in 1937. Late in 1939 he made crucial move for Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone, travelling far eastwards to Baomahuh, then a prosperous gold-mining centre. Ali was welcomed by all the Muslims there and when the goldboom died away those who had become Ahmadi took the new doctrine with them. Now the main strength of Ahmadiyya is still around Bo and Baomahun.

Fisher, Humphrey J., Ahmadiyyah: A study in contemporary Islam on the West African coast, 1963, London, Oxford University Press, 206 p.

Abstract
An account of the history and teaching of this Islamic sect. The life of Ghulam Ahmad (1835-1908 in the Punjab), the founder of Ahmadiyyah, is outlined very briefly in the introduction. The 1st part of the book gives the West African setting, pagan and Islamic. The 2nd section is concerned with Ahmadiyyah doctrine; the author treats of its teaching in relation to Islam, to Moslim modernism, to Christianity and to society. Part 3 describes the history of Ahmadiyyah in West Africa, chiefly in Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, with a glance at the Gambia, Liberia and the former French territories. In part 4 the author considers Ahmadiyyah belief, organization, education, finance and politics in West Africa. (Rev. in Afr. Affairs, 1964, p. 150-151 by E.G. Parrinder.)

Akanbi, Hafsa Mosunmola, Ahmadiyya in Lagos, 1968, bachelor thesis, University of Ibadan

Contributors
Akanbi, Hafsa Mosunmola

Lanfry, Jacques and Michael L. Fitzgerald, "The Ahmadiyya community and its expansion in Africa", Encounter: Documents for Muslim-Christian understanding 2, 1974

Balogun, Ismail A. B., Islam versus Ahmadiyya in Nigeria, 1977, Lahore, Sh. Muhammad Ashraf, 187 p.

Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya: Urban adaption to the Ivory Coast, 1980, Ph.D. dissertation, Boston University, 252 p.

Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Migrant women in Abidjan, 1983, Boston, Boston University, African Studies Center, 16 p.

Abstract
Certain Islamic beliefs relating to the role of women have changed under the stresses and pressures of urbanization and in this context Moslem migrants in Abidjan have accepted the Ahmadiyya because they have found it useful in solving problems which arose with migration. Ahmadiyya exists and is accepted only to the extent that it is able to provide solutions. It provides access to resources otherwise difficult to obtain such as schools, hospitals, guidance, and above all, a community. It also provides a sense of identity and ethnicity. It has been accepted because the traditional concepts of Islam were not providing the answers to these needs. Data presented in the article are based on fieldwork conducted in Abidjan between November 1976 and April 1978.

Yacoob, May M., "Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan", Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.

Yacoob, May M., "Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan", Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.

Yacoob, May M., "Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan", Nehemia Levtzion and Humphrey J. Fisher (ed.), Rural and urban Islam in West Africa, 1987, Boulder, Lynne Rienner, pp. 119-134.

Contributors
Yacoob, May M. | Levtzion, Nehemia | Fisher, Humphrey J.

Solaja-Alagago, R. O., Evolution of Anwarul-Islam movement of Nigeria: The Nigerian solution to the Ahmadiyyah problem, 1984, master thesis, University of Ibadan


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