Mirza Ghulam Murtaza

He was the father of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad and it was his death that launched his son on a spiritual career.

In his writings, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad repeatedly refers to his father's services to the British Raj.

Services to the British Raj

  • "My father was a well-known landlord in this country and he enjoyed great eminence in the Government's offices. He was a true devotee and well wisher of the British Government. In the mutiny of 1857 (the Muslim independence movement against colonialism is called 'mutiny' by Mirza), my father supplied fifty horses and riders to aid the British Government. For this favor to the Government, he was very popular among the officials." (Izala-e-Auham, P. 58, footnote)
  • "The benevolent Government is aware of the fact that we are from among their servants, their sympathizers and well wishers. We have come to their aid with a firm mind in every hour of need. My father was held in close and high esteem by the Government; and our services to this Government held clear distinction. I do not think that the Government has forgotten these services of ours. My father, Mirza Ghulam Murtaza, son of Mirza Ata Muhammad Al-Qadian, was a great well wisher and friend of this government and enjoyed great respect from among them. Our loyalty has been proven beyond doubt. Rather our fidelity was proven among the people and became clear to the government officials. The Government may confirm this from the officers who came to this side and lived among us; so that they may tell what sort of life we lived, and how faithful we have been in serving their Government." (Noor-ul-Haq, Roohany Khazaen, Vol. 8, P. 36-37; Noor-ul-Haq, Vol. 1, P. 27-28)
  • "I come from a family which is out and out loyal to this government. My father, Mir Ghulam Murtaza, who was considered its well-wisher, used to be granted a chair in the Governor's Darbar (cabinet) and has been mentioned by Mr. Griffin in his 'History of the Princes of Punjab'. In 1857, he helped the British government beyond his means, that is he procured fifty (50) cavaliers and horses right during the time of the mutiny. He was considered by the government to be its loyal supporter and well-wisher. A number of testimonials of appreciation received by him from the officers have unfortunately been lost. Copies of three of them, however, which had been published a long time ago, are reproduced in the margin (in English). Then, after the death of my grandfather, my elder brother Mirza Ghulam Qadir remained occupied with service to the government and when the evil-doers encountered the forces of the British government on the highway of Tanmmun, he participated in the battle on the side of the British Government (under General Nicholson he killed several freedom fighters). At the time of the death of my father and brother, I was sitting in the sidelines; but, since then, I have been helping the British for seventeen years with my pen." (Kitab-ul-Barriah, Roohany Khazaen, Vol. 13, P. 4, 5, 6, 7;  Shahadat-ul-Quran, Roohany Khazaen, Vol. 6, P. 385-387; Ishtihar Wajib al-Izhar, Sept. 20, 1897, P. 3-7; appended with Kitab-ul-Barriah)
  • "I am scion of a family which the English Government acknowledges to be faithful to it. British officers have also admitted that my father and my people are amongst those who served the Government in all sincerity and with heart and soul. I can not find the words to express my homage and gratitude to the beneficent Government on account of the peace and composure which we have found as subjects of the Government. For this reason, we - myself, my father and my brother - have girded up our loins that we will exhibit the favors and advantages of this Government, make obedience to it incumbent on the people and embed it in their hearts." (Tabligh-e-Risalat, Vol. 7, P. 8-9)

It is unfortunate to see how Mirza Ghulam proudly boasted about his father and brother having fought on the side of the British and against the Muslims. Nevertheless, in these very brief passages, Mirza expresses his immense gratefulness for all the benefits his family has enjoyed under British rule and indicates to have no goal but to somehow convince Muslims to become obedient and subservient to the British Imperialism. 
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